Global Medicine

Global Medicine Program Director Geren Stone and former Uganda Site Director Raquel Reyes visit with village health workers and program leadership from the Bugoye Health Center and the Mbarara University of Science and Technology
View of the Bugoye Health Center III in Kasase, Uganda and surrounding mountainous terrain

Bugoye Intergrated Community Case Management Initiative

The Bugoye Integrated Community Case Management Initiative (BIMI) is a community-based clinical care program that developed as part of the collaboration between Bugoye Health Center III (BHC), Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The BIMI program seeks to improve the health of rural communities in Bugoye sub-county through strengthening the local health system and innovating in community-based care. 

Integrated community case management (ICCM) implements a strategy aimed at extending case management of childhood illness beyond health facilities so more children have access to lifesaving treatments, thus reducing childhood morbidity and mortality and decreasing the patient volume on an overburdened and under-resourced health center. As the central foundation of this program, Village Health Workers (VHWs) are trained to diagnose and treat the 3 leading causes of under-5 mortality in children: malaria, diarrhea, and pneumonia. The program is currently active in 8 villages, with 39 trained village health workers.

Program Objectives:

  • Improve the health of communities
  • Strengthen the local health system
  • Innovate in community-based care

BIMI serves as the primary research, education, and public health platform for Global Medicine trainees.  The program offers trainees the opportunities to engage in collaborative scholarly work focused on improving the health of communities.  Focus of current and past work has included village health worker skills assessment, referral adherence, community acceptance of iCCM, maternal health, non-communicable disease diagnosis and care, and technology as a tool for VHW teaching and health promotion.